I have met both considerate and not so considerate midwives. Without a doubt, the majority have belonged to the first category, and to those who haven’t been as caring – I don’t blame you. I admire the work that you do, the long hours you spend in the delivery rooms, the paperwork you need to put up with. I admire all of it.  

I have nothing but respect for midwives and I feel tremendously grateful to live in Sweden, a country where healthcare is equally accessible to all. Not once during my pregnancy nor the delivery did I feel fear, in fact I felt quite the opposite. I really did feel that I was in safe hands all the way through – from planning the pregnancy to the postpartum period.

I had quite an uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery, more or less, but I won’t deny that I was exhausted (to say the least) when our daughter was finally born.

The midwives made be feel so comfortable in the patient hotel right after delivery that I almost did not want to go home. Home – which is otherwise the only place I want to be in times of exhaustion, insecurity or stress.

Knowing that they were right there, only a few footsteps away, gave me a strong sense of security. When my husband left the patient hotel for the first time, I recall the feelings of nervousness and insecurity that started to creep up on me. I was carrying our daughter in my arms when suddenly one of her legs turned completely blue. I panicked. I ran out in the hallway and screamed for help, and a midwife in her late 50s quickly came up to me: “You’re just holding her a little bit too tight, dear. Don’t you worry, she’s perfectly fine.” Her humble smile and reassuring stroke on my shoulder calmed me down in an instant.

On our second (and last) night in the hotel, the breastfeeding marathon was real. My breasts were crazy swollen, lumpy and aching and my daughter did not want to latch on properly. It was the middle of the night, I hadn’t slept for 48 hours and the tears seemed unstoppable. I felt inadequate for not being able to calm my daughter down when she screamed as if I was hurting her, while all I was trying my hardest to do was to please her.

This time, another midwife came to our room and, again, told me not to worry so much. “Let me hold her for you, and just try to relax for a moment. It’ll be alright, this is absolutely normal.” Then she helped me finding a comfortable position for breastfeeding while lying down, and put my daughter to my breast. The screaming party was finally over, and at last I felt as if I was able to breathe properly again.

Midwives provided me with their invaluable knowledge, skills and help, and I am forever thankful for the time they spent taking care of me and my family.

Obviously, we did eventually leave the patient hotel, but I’ll admit that I would’ve gladly stayed longer – in the safe hands of the midwives there. 

Girls’ Globe will be present at the 31st International Confederation of Midwives Triennial Congress – bringing you live coverage from Toronto, Canada via our #ICMLive hub. To keep up to date with all the action, use #ICMLive to engage online. 

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