Last week marked World Breastfeeding Week. Led by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action, this was the 25th annual celebration that encourages, advocates, and educates the world about the benefits of breastfeeding.

Though most people understand that breastfeeding is associated with improved health outcomes for individual babies, few understand how far-reaching nursing has the potential to be. In fact, the impact on overall health is so great that UNICEF estimates 1,300,000 lives could be saved each year if more women breastfed their babies.

This infographic from Mom Loves Best demonstrates exactly how important breastfeeding is to the overall health of infants, their mothers, and society as a whole.

Benefits to the Individual

Babies begin reaping benefits from breastfeeding right away. Produced by the mother and tailored to each baby’s individual need, breast milk contains the perfect custom blend of vitamins, fat, and protein. Breast milk also contains powerful antibodies which protect the baby from a number of afflictions. These include common ailments such as respiratory infections, diarrhea, constipation, and ear infection.

The antibodies also protect babies from more serious ailments like meningitis, salmonella poisoning, HIB, and pneumonia as well as chronic illnesses such as asthma, allergic reactions, Crohn’s disease, and Celiac disease. Breastfeeding is also associated with reduced incidents of mental health problems, delays in motor skills, poor communication abilities, and vision problems.

Benefits of breastfeeding even extend into adulthood with a reduced risk of Multiple Sclerosis, schizophrenia and other mental health problems, cardiovascular disease, and many different types of cancer. The breastfeeding mother can also enjoy personal health benefits including a lower risk of postpartum depression, improved bone mass in certain areas, and a decreased risk of ovarian and uterine cancer.

Benefits to Society at Large

The significant health benefits experienced by both breastfeeding mothers and breastfed babies can have a great impact on societal health outcomes if scaled up. The improved health of society’s members reduces its overall medical costs, lowers illness-related work absences, and improves work productivity.

Extended breastfeeding also offers a more natural form of birth and population control and results in better care of society’s children. Communities can enjoy reduced pollution due to the decreased use of commercially-made formula and its associated disposable containers.

While breastfeeding is widely understood to have health benefits for babies, few connect the surprising health outcomes to significant societal socioeconomic advantages. But when you look at the research, it’s clear that breastfeeding really does have the potential to have a miraculous effect on society’s overall welfare.

That’s why, as we look forward from World Breastfeeding Week, it’s important that we all work together for the common good.

Jenny is a mother of two, a writer and a breastfeeding advocate. You can find her trying to help new moms overcome common breastfeeding struggles on her blog, Mom Loves Best.

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Category: Breastfeeding    Motherhood
Tagged with: Child health    Maternal and Newborn Health    Normalize breastfeeding    support breastfeeding    WBW2017    World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action    World Breastfeeding Week