There have been more technology innovations in the last two centuries than over the last 5,000 years combined, and yet regardless of all the advancements – from AI chatbots, driverless cars and even using drones for home delivery – we are still hearing about the underrepresentation of women in the technology sector

According to Mashable, in 2013, only 18% of computer science graduates in the U.S. were women. Professionally, women make up only 29% of the science and engineering workforce. A recent study found that gender stereotypes around STEM can affect girls as young as age six.

It’s mind-boggling that in this digital age it still feels like we haven’t made much progress with women in STEM. But rather than feeling frustrated, I advocate that a better attitude is to think, “what am I going to do about it?”.

After years of battling with this issue in the digital sector, and feeling my confidence dip and slide, I feel that the worst thing we can do is focus too much on the views others feed us. We’re more connected to other people now than ever before and, with our current behaviour of consuming news, certain mainstream narratives can really frames our mindsets. Regular tech news about men inventing and creating are presented as the norm. After a while it’s easy to believe the subtext: STEM is for men.

I’m advocating for change starting at the individual level. From my experience in digital tech and programming – it works. If you’re interested and want to get involved, then don’t listen to what others say. Ignore the negative noise and instead, pay more attention to strengthening your own interests. We must be proactive and empower ourselves, because waiting to be empowered just isn’t going to work.

So how can you achieve this self-empowerment? No matter your age, background or experience, check out these top tips to unlock your potential:

  1. Age is no barrier but commitment is key.

    Tech is open to everyone. You don’t have to be a millennial to get involved. If you have previous working experience and skills, these can be transferred into a new role within the tech sector. All you need is passion and commitment to a clear idea. Check out Masako Wakamiya’s app this 81-year-old woman learnt to code Apple’s Swift programming language from a younger friend via Skype and Facebook messenger.

  2. Embrace failures.

    This group of students participated in a 15-hour hackathon but encountered a lot of stumbles, accidents and errors within the short deadline. They eventually pulled it together and went on to win first place with their 3D printed device which translates printed text into Braille.

  3. Make, be, do.

    There are loads of great (free) online programming courses to help you get started. But the crux of any self-taught journey is that you have to put your skills in practice. You have to actually do something. Try building new things, over and over. If you’re in the right industry then you’ll be fuelled by desire to keep trying. Remember, think of yourself as a coder, not a girl who codes! 

  4. Sharing is caring.

    Coding together with friends or in a team can make your learning experience more enjoyable and expose you to a wide range of ideas you might not have considered on your own. Check out Meetup.com to find events happening in your neighbourhood. Even better, if you have the opportunity, why not help others into coding too and grow the community.  As they say, ‘to teach is to learn twice over’!

  5. Stay curious.

    Remember that tech is constantly evolving and programming languages change. Read widely, listen to podcasts, and experience as many coding events as you can. The ability to self-teach is already a critical skill that many tech startups look for, so don’t be left behind!

As Reshua Saujani – founder of Girls Who Code – says, there’ll be 1.4 million jobs in computer science in 2020. Girls are currently on track to hold just 3% of them.

We have to change this reality, and we have to change it now. We’re living in a digital age and headed towards an even greater tech-powered future. Of course, it can seem like there a million reasons why you shouldn’t get into tech, or can’t. But as long as you want to, then that one reason to start is all you need.

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Category: STEM    Tech
Tagged with: coding    gender bias    gender stereotypes    Girls in Tech    Inspiration    Women in STEM    Women in Technology

Rosalyn Pen

@rosalynpen

Rosalyn is a freelance digital strategist and content producer with front-end dev skills, committed to women’s empowerment. She is passionate about tech and innovation for social good and is a self-taught blockchain enthusiast. Follow her humble mumbles and grumbles on Twitter @rosalynpen

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