If it seems like the world is crying over spilled milk right now, I promise it’s much more than that. In May this year, a global breastfeeding resolution was passed at the World Health Assembly in Geneva, but not without a fight.

What Happened?

As recently reported by the New York Times, the proposed World Health Organization (WHO) resolution aimed to limit the marketing of breastmilk alternatives, and to “protect, promote and support breastfeeding”. An American delegation attempted to block the resolution, and made threats of trade measures and cuts to military aid to countries planning to introduce the measure. This, naturally, made other nations hesitant to support the resolution.

Ultimately, Russia proposed the final resolution, though U.S. delegates successfully had language removed stating the WHO would support nations discouraging misleading promotion by formula companies.

Why It Matters

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding as the optimal source of nutrition through a baby’s first year of life. Breastfeeding provides benefits for both baby and mother. In fact, breastmilk could lead to lowered risk of asthma, type 2 diabetes, and obesity in babies and lowered risk of breast and ovarian cancers in moms.

A joint investigation by the Guardian and Save the Children in poorer regions of the Philippines found four large formula companies (Nestlé, Abbott, Mead Johnson and Wyeth) to be enticing health workers to promote formula in addition to distributing pamphlets disguised as medical advice to mothers. Although this is an explicit violation of the WHO’s international code, formula promotion persists in poorer countries where mothers are less informed about breastfeeding benefits.

Soon after transitioning in 2017, the new American administration re-enacted the global gag rule, prohibiting international non-profits receiving U.S. government funding from sharing abortion service information. Now the U.S. is supporting pro-formula companies over policies promoting global childhood nutrition.

This is not just another example of prioritizing private profit over public health, but rather, yet another infringement upon women’s rights.

While there are, of course, circumstances where choosing formula over breastmilk may be the best option for mother and child, every mother deserves to make her own informed decision, and country delegations should support that globally.

  1. Share
  2. Tweet
  3. Copy Link
Category: Breastfeeding    Motherhood    Politics    Society
Tagged with: Breast Milk    Breastfeeding    Donald Trump    formula milk    Global Health    Maternal and Child health    World Health Organization