Women face unique challenges throughout their lives. For some, one such challenge can be pregnancy. It is an exciting and beautiful time, but it can also be a major test on the strength of a woman’s body and mind.

Did you know a woman’s socioeconomic status has a surprising amount of influence, not just on her baby, but also on how her pregnancy goes? Childbirth outcomes are heavily tied to socioeconomics, with women in more impoverished regions experiencing a wide range of additional challenges.

While some of these challenges are health-related, others are not. Many factors combine for a successful pregnancy and birth, and an individual’s financial situation has a huge impact. Of course, most people can’t just change their financial standing quickly, and so we need to examine ways we can change the culture around pregnancy.

In countries that lack universal health care, financial status has a significant impact on prenatal outcomes. Merely being able to afford regular medical checkups, prenatal vitamins and any additional medications can significantly increase the chances of a healthy pregnancy and baby. It’s impossible to understate how important prenatal care is.

Access to medical care goes beyond prenatal care, though. Women in lower socioeconomic classes tend to be less likely to be able to access health care before becoming pregnant, which also contributes to the health outcomes of the child. Even with socialized health care, the risks remain, because money affects every aspect of our lives.

Women can also suffer in countries without socialized health care. One U.S. case, for example, shows how insurance companies took advantage of pregnant women who qualified for government-funded Medicaid. The companies claimed to give the women coverage, then denied their claims while still collecting the money from the government. This is just one case that demonstrates how willing people and companies can be to take advantage of those in ‘vulnerable’ positions.

There are many countries where access to quality prenatal care should not be an issue. Universal health care should eliminate the barrier, but it doesn’t stop women from having problems. As some studies have demonstrated, even with socialized health care, pregnant women in lower income brackets tend to have more challenging pregnancies, including problems like preeclampsia, premature birth and obstetrical hemorrhage.

Lower incomes make women more vulnerable to things like stress, domestic violence, poor personal health choices and drug use. It has been shown that stress is one of the precursors to birth issues like premature birth and low birth weight.

Studies also show that women experiencing poverty are more likely to experience abuse from their partner. This abuse often occurs alongside other issues, like financial dependence on the abuser and isolation from a support network. The stress, isolation and risk of hospitalization all take a serious toll. Women who are pregnant and have been in the relationship for a while may see violence escalate during their pregnancy.

The problems related to having a new baby don’t just impact the mom and baby. They’re a serious issue for everyone in society as well. Pregnant women are certainly in a place of high vulnerability, but they are not weak links. Women make up half of the population, so we need to address the gendered issues at play.

Addressing the reasons behind the systemic problems that women and new moms face will undeniably lead us to a better and healthier tomorrow for everyone.

The Conversation

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