Tariro Mantsebo is a medical doctor and intersectional feminist from Zimbabwe. She recently founded earth + blood, dedicated to the holistic healing, wellness and validation of black and brown women.

1. What brought you to start your new initiative earth + blood? 

I started earth + blood, with the intention of creating a space for black and brown female bodies to feel validated in the realm of health and wellness.

The objective is to focus on physical, mental, sexual, emotional, spiritual experiences through the lens of intersectionality.

This means taking into consideration social, cultural, political and economic factors that play a role in the path to good health for the individual and/or community.

It’s about inclusivity in the pursuit of holistic health and wellbeing.

2. What perspectives will you bring through earth + blood that aren’t center stage in the self care / mental health / SRHR space today?  

Some of the perspectives that I would like to bring to the forefront, are those that recognise and validate the experiences of BIPOC women, African women, LGBTQI women and disabled women.

The self-care and wellness space is very much white-centred, despite many of the practices and concepts being rooted in indigenous, Eastern and African philosophies of health.

People from marginalized communities need to be able to enter these spaces in part as reclamation of their identity and health, and as meaningful contributors.

I would like to see more collaboration and representation as we have these discussions centred around holistic health, self-care, SRHR and mental health collectively.

3. You’re a medical doctor and an intersectional feminist, how has Girls’ Globe supported you in developing your activism? 

Girls’ Globe has been an amazing support in the development of my activism.

The experience of being a member of Girls’ Globe has widened my scope of knowledge and awareness when it comes to women’s health challenges GLOBALLY.

Participating in Girls’ Globe’s Digital Storytelling for Impact online course, gave me an opportunity to expand my ideas, to have a clear plan and to learn new digital skills that have helped me create this virtual platform.

As the initiative grows, the encouragement and acknowledgment from my fellow co-members has been a beautiful display of comradery and sisterhood.

4. What is one thing our global audience can do today to support your movement building?

I would encourage this global audience to learn more about health disparities that black women face globally by following Instagram pages such as earth + blood.

The conversation needs to be centred around health equity and inclusivity for all women.

This includes in access to health, research studies, funding, health education and elimination of medical bias based on race and/or gender.

I would also like to see black and brown women challenge the existing narratives about their health and wellbeing by giving themselves permission to explore their bodies, sexuality, emotional and mental wellness.

And discover the world of self-care and holistic health.

Learn more about earth+blood here and meet other Girls’ Globe members here.

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