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Health

Mental health, menstruation, sexual and reproductive health and more about our bodies from the voices of women and girls worldwide.
Cover photo for: Why are women still dying in childbirth in Nepal? A mother recovers with her newborn, who was delivered under the supervision of trained health professionals at Sri Krishna Medical College and Hospital, a public health facility. Institutional births are one of the government of India's key strategies to reduce infant and maternal mortality, and to improve the overall health of the mother and child. An average of 7,000 births take place at Sri Krishna Medical College and Hospital each year.

Why do Women Still Die Giving Birth in Nepal?

Maternal mortality is one of the leading causes of death for women of reproductive age in Nepal, most of which occur due to direct obstetric complications at the time of birth and during the postnatal period.

The overwhelming majority of maternal deaths occur in rural, poverty ridden areas where healthcare services are often inadequate or inaccessible. Even in places with access to health services, there is a severe shortage of trained medical staff.

Learn more about why women are still dying in Nepal and what can be done to prevent these deaths.

A picture of a small girl riding on a burned skeleton of a motorcycle in Myanmar.

Children of Myanmar – A Traumatized Generation

In the midst of ashes, formerly her home and village, this wee girl attempts to normalize her world with a game of make-believe motorcycle ride. The scene, surreal as it is, is but one example of the destruction and horror inflicted on Burmese people –

Photo of period blood in underwear with the words c'est la vie. Cover photo for gender-inclusive language around periods post.

We Need to Talk About Periods in a More Inclusive Way

The concepts of gender and sexuality are evolving at a decent pace to make the world more gender-fluid. Yet, the topic of ‘menstruation’ is still fraught with cissexism – or the discrimination against transgender and gender-nonconforming individuals.

The language we use is important.

VOTE graphic. Cover photo for Your Words and Your Vote

Your Words and Your Vote

Over the 48 hours since the news broke about the U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade, I have cried, screamed, talked with many people, considered the various actions I can now take, and then began taking them. This post is one of those actions.

She Survived Cancer—and Then Had to Battle Iatrogenic Fistula

Use your voice to support women who have survived the unthinkable. Esther is a 41-year-old mother of five from the town of Bariadi, in the Simiyu region of Tanzania. In 2017, she experienced a life-changing event. She began suffering from excruciating pain in her stomach

Cover photo: Bans off our Bodies. Protest against abortion ban in US

Bans Off Our Bodies – A Poem for Women’s Liberation

They seek to curtail our reproductive freedom,
strip pregnant women of reproductive agency,
thwart pro-choice legislation,
shut down abortion clinics,
try to convince us that our bodies are not ours to keep.

That our personhood and bodily autonomy are conditional.

Cover Image for post Period Poverty in Pandemics

Why We Need an Integrated Response to Period Poverty in Pandemics

When household incomes are constricted, often luxury items, and even period products, are deprioritised. This impacts an individual’s ability to attain menstrual health – and the risk of experiencing period poverty. So, how is COVID-19 impacting period poverty? What can be done to address period poverty during this pandemic?

Woman protesting the war in Ukraine

In the War in Ukraine Women and Children Pay the Heaviest Price

A few weeks ago, a harrowing image of a pregnant woman injured in the Russian bombing of a Ukrainian maternity and children’s hospital was doing rounds in the news and social media. Widely-circulated pictures showed the woman stroking her bloodied lower abdomen as rescuers carried her through

Photo of Dr Nasra Ibrahim, a fistula surgeon dedicated to ending fistula in Somaliland

Being a Woman Is My Medical Superpower

Dr. Nasra Ibrahim is a fistula surgeon who travels about seven times a year from Uganda to her home country of Somaliland to treat women with fistula, a devastating childbirth injury that leaves a woman incontinent and—more often than not—shunned by her community. Read what

Women in Medicine Illustration by Jennifer Bogartz

What’s it like for Women in Medicine in 2022?

One common question I often get asked by high schoolers and pre-med students is- ‘what it’s like to be a doctor, especially a female doctor. They’re apprehensive if they should be pursuing years of education and rigorous training. They ask me what my average day

Mental health, menstruation, sexual and reproductive health and more about our bodies from the voices of women and girls worldwide.

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