Top 5 Feminist Moments of 2017

1. Women’s March

On January 21 2017, advocates for policies regarding human rights and women’s rights, immigration reform, healthcare reform, reproductive rights, environmental protections, LGBTQ rights, racial equality and freedom of religion marched around the world. Many marchers protested the inauguration of U.S. President Donald Trump and his anti-women, anti-immigration, anti-environmental protection, anti-Islamic and other offensive rhetoric. The Washington Post reported that the Women’s March was likely the largest single-day demonstration in recorded U.S. history with over 400 planned marches in the U.S alone.  Over 60 sister marches took place worldwide from Mexico City to Amsterdam to Durban. The march embodied the collective power of individuals standing up for women and standing up for what they believe in.

2. International Women’s Day x A Day Without Women

March 8th 2017 marked International Women’s Day and ‘A Day Without Women’. The goal of A Day Without Women was to “recognize the enormous value that women of all backgrounds add to our socio-economic system–while receiving lower wages and experiencing greater inequities, vulnerability to discrimination, sexual harassment, and job insecurity.” Women took the day off from paid and unpaid labor, avoided shopping for one day (with the exception of small, women- and minority-owned businesses), and wore red in solidarity. Women worldwide participated (including Girls’ Globe blogger Bita).

3. Wonder Woman

Last summer, Wonder Woman hit theatres and ignited necessary debate regarding women and their media portrayal. Wonder Woman is a female heroine who saves the world, yet does so half-naked. As a white woman with impossible proportions, her large-breasts and sexy outfit play into a toxic narrative that can disempower young girls. The conversation surrounding the portrayal of a female heroine is essential to improving the representation and treatment of women in the media and beyond. Yet, earning over $800 million, Wonder Woman is the highest-grossing live-action film directed by a woman. As the reviews of the movie came out, essential debates emerged on what makes a ‘feminist film’ and whether Wonder Woman was a feminist icon or a feminist failure. Regardless of your opinion, these healthy conversations encourage critical thinking and ultimately move towards equality for women.

4. Electing Women to Office

Hillary Clinton’s loss of the 2016 U.S. election was a watershed moment for women as it bore the Women’s March and new political organization throughout the world. In the 2017 elections, women, LGBTQ candidates and candidates of color made history. In Virginia, Danica Roem became the state’s first transgender lawmaker and beat the incumbent lawmaker who drafted a ‘bathroom bill’ to stop transgender people from using the bathroom corresponding to their gender identity. Voters in Charlotte, NC elected their first African-American woman to mayor – Vi Lyles. Other historically unrepresented groups gained key positions of power, too. In Helena, MN elected progressive candidate Wilmot Collins – a refugee from Liberia – to mayor. Outside the U.S., an indigenous woman ran for office in Mexico for the first time, representing the voices of minorities and historically oppressed and underrepresented groups.

5. #MeToo

In October 2017, #MeToo went viral across social media to decry widespread sexual harassment and assault. The hashtag gained momentum as The New York Times reported that more than a dozen women accused Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein of sexually harassing, assaulting or raping them.  Following the Weinstein accusation, dozens of other powerful men from U.S. Congressman to actors to media producers faced accusations of sexual misconduct. While the accusations and response have been mixed, these men were predominantly white and always powerful. Time Magazine selected The Silence Breakers for their 2017 Person of the Year award amidst these events. #MeToo represents a long pattern of women facing harassment and job insecurity in the workplace. Hopefully, in light of these events, workplace culture will change and women will get the respect they deserve.

What were YOUR feminist highlights of 2017? Please feel free to leave a comment and let us know! 

Happy Holidays from Girls’ Globe!

The best of 2017 on girlsglobe.org…

We Need to Talk About Mental Health 
by Gabrielle Rocha Rios 
“A big misconception about mental health issues is that they are strictly in a person’s mind and don’t make them physically sick – but that is far from true. Mental health issues are never a person’s choice – they are disorders, and can affect anyone, at any age, anywhere in the world.”

If They Kill Me 
by Bita Aranda 
“How could I not use this platform to tell the rest of the world what they are doing to us? How could I not write about the gender based violence we live amongst every day? How could I not use this privilege as a way to give those women and girls their voices back?”

#MeToo: We’re all in this Together
by Preeti Shakya 
“I remember being subjected to harassment long before I even knew what harassment or assaults were. School-going boys. Middle-aged men. Married men. A policeman. That boy who considers himself a ‘feminist’. Colleagues. On the bus. Across the pavements. In a queue. At a temple.”

How to be Alone
by Farahnaz Mohammed
“I wish we lived in a culture that valued a woman who does her job well, or recognized her role as a sister or a daughter or a friend as much as a girlfriend or a wife. I wish our knee-jerk instinct in supporting the women we care about wasn’t to try to remedy them of their singledom.”

At 25, I’m Finally Meeting my Cycle
by Eleanor Gall 
“As I’ve tried to educate myself about natural menstrual cycles – which I’m now experiencing for the first time in my adult life – I feel more alert to the signs and signals my body sends me. I’m working on building my knowledge of what’s happening at different stages of my cycle, and I feel more able to listen to and respect what my body wants and needs at each.”

Keeping Girls Healthy in DRC
by CARE

“Adolescents and young people in DRC often find it difficult or impossible to access health care. Information and services related to sex and reproductive health (SRH) are especially hard to find due to cultural norms and expectations (such as abstinence before marriage) that prohibit young people from seeking them out.”

10 Things that Happened to me After Childbirth
by Julia Wiklander
“Throughout my first pregnancy, I didn’t think too much about the time after birth – with only one session with my midwife and one parental class to prepare for breastfeeding. I was not fully prepared for what was going to come – and perhaps I could never be prepared enough – but there were a few things that happened to me, my body and my baby that I wish I had known before giving birth.”

Standing Up for Girls in the Time of Trump
by Ashley Lackovich-Van Gorp
“My work, like all work, begins at home. I visibly resist hate for and with my own daughters, two immigrants of color who are growing up in a time when integral parts of their identity are being challenged. They, and all girls in my life, must see me modeling contested truths: black lives matter, native lives matter and refugee lives matter; women’s rights are human rights; no human being is illegal and love is love is love is love.”

Menstrual Cups: Breaking the Bloody Taboo 
by Terri Harris 
“When you’re comfortable with your period, you become curious and intrigued by the female anatomy. When you begin to speak frankly about menstruating you can change other people’s perceptions about their periods too. The cup is the gateway to being open and honest about your period. Being frank about menstruating may just steer girls away from those feelings of embarrassment and shame.”

Midwives Made Me Feel Like Not Going Home
by Mia Ydholm
“It was the middle of the night, I hadn’t slept for 48 hours and the tears seemed unstoppable. I felt inadequate for not being able to calm my daughter down when she screamed as if I was hurting her, while all I was trying my hardest to do was to please her. Midwives provided me with their invaluable knowledge, skills and help, and I am forever thankful for the time they spent taking care of me and my family.

From Child Worker to Girl With Big Dreams
by SOS Children’s Villages
“Families that allow them to be children and do what children are supposed to do: learn, play and feel loved. For girls who live with vulnerable families, it’s critical that we help them become stable and strong through family support programs in order to prevent family breakdown and child abandonment.”

2017 has been an important and exciting year in many ways, but it has also seen its fair share of trialling and difficult moments. We’ve seen them in the media, in our political systems, in our Facebook feeds, and we’ve felt them in our personal lives. We’re sure you have too, and we hope you know that we’re here with you through it all – the good, the bad and the in-between. So much of what Girls’ Globe has accomplished so far is down to you – our incredible readers, contributors and supporters – and so we want to take this opportunity to say THANK YOU.

We hope that whatever 2017 has looked like for you, you find yourself able to take the rest you need as we reach the end of the year and look to 2018. We hope you are able to switch off – whatever that means to you – and to surround yourself with the people, places and things that bring you the most joy.

We wish you a beautiful, restful, restorative holiday and a very happy new year!

Five Feminist Resolutions for 2017

2017 has already proven to be a tough year for feminists. And we can expect to be tried and tested for the many months to come. As we look to the coming battles, here are five feminist New Year’s resolutions:

1. Show up

After more than four million feminists showed up for the Women’s March on Washington and the 300+ sister marches globally, it is safe to say we are getting good at this one. But, it is crucial we continue to show up for what we believe in. Whether that be to continue marching, or to meet other feminists in your city, or to support feminist films, books, and concerts. While social media is an incredibly powerful tool to link the global community, cultivating a physical community is equally important and special. In 2017, let’s make sure we are there for our fellow females, and remember that together we are stronger.

2. Volunteer

Alongside showing up for events, protests, and meet-ups, we must continue to support the incredible work of Planned Parenthood, ACLU, National Organization for Women, and even Girls’ Globe. You can make a difference with your money, time, or simply advocating for an organization in your own network. Many of these organizations will come under threat over the course of the Trump Administration and we cannot let that happen. Whatever level of participation you can commit to helps, and a little empathy and altruism never hurt anybody.

3. Speak up

Silence is acceptance. And if there was ever a time we needed to elevate women’s voices, it’s now. Contrary to what some have said, words do matter. And words have impact. If we collectively speak up about what we believe in, what we value, and what is not okay to us, we will be heard. It is so easy to accept and internalize the patriarchy that surrounds us, but we cannot let it get us down. We can be empowered by our collective experiences and rather than commiserate, we can rise up. With every social media post, face-to-face conversation, video on Million Women’s Voices, and blog post written we will slowly, but surely dismantle the patriarchy.

4. Educate

I do not know everything. You do not know everything. No one knows everything. But to be an effective ally we must know the facts. In the spirit of intersectionality, we must remember that women’s rights, our legal system, our criminal justice system, our environment, and our public policies are all connected. While you certainly do not have to fight for every issue, knowing the facts is a solid step to continuing effective advocacy.   While certain pieces of the media have simply disregarded the truth as “alternative facts,” it is important to know why we fight, how we fight, and the statistics behind it. With the advent of fake news and spun falsehoods in our social media sphere, it can be easy to end up in a Facebook feud over what is true.

5. Self care

Being a wild feminist in 2017 will not be easy and in fighting all our fights, remember to take care of yourself. Fighting the patriarchy is a lifelong battle, and it does the movement no good for you to burn out. So when you’re feeling down, take a bubble bath, cuddle with your kitten, pop on a feminist film on Netflix. Staying motivated, passionate, and driven is exhausting, so after a long day subverting patriarchal paradigms, treat yourself.