femicide

Here’s what we could find on the subject.
Abuse & Violence Rates Rise Amid Global Lockdowns by Tariro Mantsebo for Girls' Globe

Abuse & Violence Rates Rise Amid Global Lockdowns

The pandemic is creating an environment of high stress, anxiety and depression for millions of people. It’s taking an economic and social toll. It is also leading to increased rates of domestic violence. In times of crisis or natural disaster, children’s and women’s health and safety are the most severely compromised. In our current situation, this pattern is compounded by limited access to safe centers, shelters and health services.

Illustrator Laiza Onofre expresses her rage against femicides in Mexico during the protest.

Laiza Onofre: The Mexican Illustrator Marched Against Femicides

“Around the last few weeks, there have been femicides that have hit many of us straight to the heart.

Every day 10 women are murdered in my country and nobody seems to care.

It was out of that anger that I wanted to create and share these posters for the march.” says Laiza Onofre. Read more about why she took to her art to the streets of Mexico.

A Day Without Them: Women Strike in Mexico by Lorena Monroy for Girls' Globe

A Day Without Them: Women Strike in Mexico

#UnDiaSinEllas (A Day Without Them) is a strike to protest against the violence we live with every day. It is a simulation of all the women who have gone missing and been murdered in the past years. It is also a protest to demand larger support for women’s rights. There will be an unignorable economic impact, since it is estimated this strike will cost the country around 1.3 million dollars.

International Women's Day in Latin America, Laiza Onofre

International Women’s Day in Latin America

On this International Women’s Day in Latin America women march. and then they strike.

Micaela. Pamela. Brenda. Guadalupe. Jordana. Octavia. Agustina. Ingrid. Fátima. Angie. Manuela. Doris. Adriana. Luisa. Ana. Luz. Jesenia. Mónica.

These are just a few of the women and girls who were killed in Latin America in 2020 – a region where there is a new femicide every two hours. There were 1206 registered femicides in Brazil in 2018. In Mexico, there were 1006 registered cases last year. In Argentina there were 68 registered femicides so far this year. It’s time for it to stop.

An Empty Street in Mexico. Women Strike in Mexico.

Mexico Keeps Bleeding, So Women Strike

Mexico is hurting. It is my great but scary homeland. We keep counting death after death – femicide after femicide. Most of the time it is exhausting. But sometimes this supposed greatness, that many of us miss and desire to recover, is the reason that keeps us moving and not giving up. That’s why women will strike in Mexico.

In 2019, at least 34,582 homicides happened and there were 1006 femicides. One of the most violent years in our history.

There's a Feminist Revolution on the Rise in Mexico, by Lorena Monroy for Girls' Globe. Photo by Sara Achik

There’s a Feminist Revolution on the Rise in Mexico

I listen to a lot of women discrediting the movement taking place in Mexico right now and it makes my skin crawl. Victim blaming hasn’t changed one bit since I wrote that post last year. This is a battle we are going to fight for many years to come.

Violence in South Africa: Enough is Enough

Violence in South Africa: Enough is Enough

It would be naive of me to write that my country is progressing on this issue. The death of Uyinene caused an outcry of emotion from around the country. “Enough is enough” was belted out at protests and heard across cities. This was too close to home. We could all see ourselves in Uyinene’s story. After all these years, enough was actually enough. We cried, shouted and protested to make our voices heard.

There is a War Against Women in South Africa

Recently, two 19 year old women were murdered in the space of two weeks. These are just the women I know of. One of the girls, Jessé Hess, attended my university. The other girl, Uyinene Mrwetyana, attended another university also based in this city. But these are just the women I know of.

I thought to myself, “how does this continue to happen?” Then I remembered that I live in South Africa and femicide is normal here. I wanted to be angry but I am done being angry. I am done speaking about the problem. I am just tired of this BS. I am tired of wondering if I am next.

How Glitter became the Symbol of Mexico's Movement Against Gender-Based Violence

Mexico’s Glitter Protests are a Movement Against Violence

Like many other women across the country, we were part of the glitter protests. We both agreed that at a time like this, being among women was where we felt the safest. It was only the possibility of retaliation from security forces that we feared.

1,741 Mexican Women Are No Longer With Us

In Mexico, at least 1,741 woman have been victims of femicide in 2017. This statistics comes from geophysicist Maria Salguero, who has been collecting and compiling data in an interactive map.

Remembering Micaela García

We don’t want to have to keep fighting for justice. We don’t want to be scared when walking alone or taking a cab. Micaela would be proud to see her loved ones continue her activism against violence against women.

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