Midwives of the World: Part 2

In order to reach a completely equal society, all basic human rights need to be secured. One of these is maternal health. The success of a country can often be traced back to successful maternal health programming. Therefore, my project partner Anna and I decided to create a documentary series about midwives around the world.

To create this documentary and to get a fair picture of the situation for mothers and midwives around the world, we have collaborated with the White Ribbon Alliance (WRA). The WRA is an incredible organization for maternal health, and a network for volunteers from all over the world. We decided to focus on White Ribbon Alliance Indonesia, or Aliansi Pita Putih Indonesia (APPI), and visited their team in Jakarta earlier this year.

With the three parts of our documentary, we hope to do two things. One is to present a fair picture and comparison of the maternal health situation in Sweden and Indonesia. The other is to inspire people to make a change in their local communities, just like the volunteers of the White Ribbon Alliance do, or like midwives do in their daily work.

In this second episode you get to follow our very first days in Indonesia, featuring visits to health centers, a women’s empowerment group, and a class for pregnant and elderly. If you feel inspired- leave a comment and share, so that we can help make a change for mothers all around the globe!

If you missed our first episode, make sure to catch up here

#13 – Midwives Providing Safe Birth in Humanitarian Settings

 

“(Midwives) give support to women whether they are in labour or not, they are social solidarity players in the local communities, not only the providers of health services for women & newborns.” – Mohamed Afifi, UNFPA

Welcome back to The Mom Pod! In this episode Julia Wiklander connects us with midwives and advocates about maternal and newborn health in humanitarian settings, at the 31st ICM Triennial Congress in Toronto, Canada. The midwives that we meet work in Mexico, Somalia and Afghanistan and share experiences from their work and talk about the challenges they face to deliver care.

With a world in constant political change and with the largest number of displaced people in history, ensuring that every mother and every child has access to a midwife during pregnancy and birth, is a difficult promise to keep. The world needs more midwives.

“They’re not refugees, they are not citizens – they are migrants. We need to start to name this as a public health issue.” – Cristina Alonso, Midwife working in Mexico

Our conversation is also broadened by UNFPA Reproductive Health Specialist for the Arab States, Mohammed Afifi, who tells us that in the region, midwives is the cadre of health professionals that are committing to delivering care, despite conflicts that push away many of their colleagues.

Safe Birth Even Here is a Campaign run by UNFPA to raise awareness of the high rate of maternal deaths in emergency situations and increase support for services to protect the rights of the women and girls living in humanitarian and fragile settings. Johnson & Johnson is one of the partners supporting the campaign, and has committed to supporting health professionals at the frontlines of care. We speak to Joy Marini at Johnson & Johnson about why the company is investing in the health of women & children in humanitarian settings and what they are doing to ensure that midwives receive support in their important work. 

In this episode, Young Midwife Leader, Massoma Jafari from Afghanistan, interviews Jane Philpott, the Canadian Minister of Health and asks her what action Canada is taking to support midwives in Afghanistan. Philpott gives the young midwife advice and promises new connections. A meeting that hopefully sparks further engagement by the Canadian government to invest in midwives. 

Listen to the full episode here.

During the ICM Congress, Johnson & Johnson launched their new initative – the GenH Challenge. This exciting opportunity hopes to encourage midwives to see themselves as innovators with the power to help to create the healthiest generation in human history – “GenH”. The GenH Challenge is looking to discover brand new ideas from the front lines of care that can change the trajectory of health. If this sounds daunting, don’t worry! The competition welcomes ideas in their earliest stages, and it welcomes small ideas that have the potential to create great impact. You can apply any time until 4 October 2017. Full guidelines are available at www.genhchallenge.com.

See all of the Girls’ Globe LIVE coverage from the 31st ICM Triennial Congress in Toronto, Canada here

Franka Cadée Calls for Midwives to Take Action

”All midwives here know when it’s time to breathe and when it’s time to push. This is our time to push!”

Franka Cadée, the new President of the International Confederation of Midwives closed the 31st Triennial Congress by addressing midwives from around the world with the main message that it is time to “humanize midwifery care – together”. She mentioned that many women across the world are at risk of receiving care too little too late or too much too soon. 

Young Midwifery Leader, Samara Ferrara, from Mexico had the opportunity to speak with Franka Cadée prior to the end of the Congress. She asked how the new president is planning to continue the work to ensure universal access to maternal, newborn and child health care, as well as, how she will support midwives in Mexico to have improved quality education. Franka Cadée also sends her key message to midwives as they return home to their communities. See the two videos below.

Fathers’ Role in Achieving Gender Equality

Women in OECD countries spend, on average, 4.5 hours per day doing unpaid work such as cooking and caring for children. This compares to about 2 hours for men. Even if the division of unpaid labor has become more equal over the years, women are still doing more, and this results in unequal health outcomes for everyone.

“Women, even full-time working women, spend fewer hours on average doing paid work than their husbands or partners do. That may be due in part to the fact that there’s this expectation or default arrangement where they are doing more of the child care or housework.” – Kim Parker, Pew Research Center

When I attended WABA’s Global Breastfeeding Forum in October 2016, I was a struck by Duncan Fisher’s (Family Initiative UK) enthusiasm towards fathers’ role in advancing breastfeeding progress globally.

In this year’s International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) Congress, I was pleased to see that Fisher was invited to a plenary session on women’s rights where he spoke about engaging fathers in maternal and newborn health, and the impact this has on advancing gender equality. Because, as Fisher put it, “the unequal sharing of caring roles is a major global driver of gender inequality”. And we know for sure that gender inequality damages both the physical and mental health of millions of women and girls worldwide.

Fathers are interested, they want information and they do want to be close to their children. Why then are women still the ones taking on the majority of the responsibility, and what consequences does this have? According to Fisher, there is a lack of public information and services directed at the fathers. They simply don’t know about all the benefits of engaging in caring for their children.

The evidence is out there – and it’s abundant!

Everyone wins when fathers engage, both in the short and long-term:

  • a father’s testosterone levels drop after the baby is born if he is physically present with the baby (i.e. cuddling!)
  • his oxytocin levels rise and so does the baby’s
  • breastfeeding rates increase
  • maternal mortality rates reduce
  • the mental health of mother and child improves
  • access to services improve
  • violence and abuse decrease

Fisher spoke about the neurobiological impact involvement has not only on the father’s brain, but also the mother’s. Caring for babies changes the brains of both parents, and the change lasts for the rest of their lives. And the more a parent cares for their baby, the more their brain changes. As if this wasn’t evidence enough: the more the parents’ brain changes, the better the child’s social skills are when they reach school.

Fisher also stressed the importance of midwives in fathers’ engagement, and said that midwives play an imperative role in encouraging fathers to cuddle skin-to-skin with their babies within the first few hours of life, and in informing men of the benefits of their involvement.

The unequal division of the responsibility of caring for, managing and educating children is unsustainable, and it undeniably affects mothers’ and babies’ health. Mothers should not be solely responsible for caring for their families – fathers must engage in order for us to achieve optimal health for women and children, as well as gender equality.

I am certain that the redistribution and reduction of unpaid care work and improved gender equality at home will improve quality of life, not only for women, but also for children and men. It most certainly is a win-win situation.

Family Initiative UK have launched an online course delivered by midwives and trainers which explores these issues. If you’re present in Toronto at this year’s ICM Congress, make sure to visit Family Initiative UK’s booth and learn more about the course! 

Girls’ Globe is at the 31st ICM Triennial Congress in Toronto, Canada. See all of the Girls’ Globe LIVE coverage here