self love

Here’s what we could find on the subject.
Self Care for Black Women. Black woman smiling with floral crown

Radical Self-Care is a Necessity for Black Women

Growing up, I was taught that black women are strong. That we are the pillars of community. That we raise and protect villages, and that we must uphold our men. We’re expected to this faultlessly and without rest. In activism, black women have been at the forefront of championing change. We’ve lead protests and initiatives in our community such as the “Black Lives Matter” Movement founded by three queer, black women. As much as we’re seen as resilient, fierce and powerful, we aren’t afforded the opportunity to be vulnerable, gentle and tender to ourselves.

Instagram, Influencers & Healthy Body Image: the impact of social media on body image

Instagram, Influencers & Healthy Body Image

Too late in my life, I realised that there are many different forms of eating disorders. I never labelled myself as being bulimic or anorexic and could therefore convince myself that nothing was wrong. But, in hindsight, the way I was treating my body was not healthy.

Self Care is a necessity

Self care is Not a Buzzword, It’s a Necessity

I wanted to write a post to end this year on a positive note. There are changemakers worthy to be named and revolutions we must remember. Yet, one thing keeps coming to mind – the ever so important practice of self care. As we fight the good fight and tackle human rights abuses in conflict zones, gender based violence or the climate crisis – we need to be our best selves. Self care is not a buzzword – it’s a necessity.

This year has been a tricky year for me. Personally, I have battled my inner demands on myself as a mother and entrepreneur – and just as a woman of my generation. I’ve struggled with my hopes and dreams. I’ve faced setbacks and disappointments. But there is light at the end of the tunnel. Here are some of the most important lessons for me this year.

The Power of Your Story Podcast

Tariro Mantsebo: Being Enough by Existence

“Girls and young women, take the time to know who you are. When you are clear with who you are, what people say and what people do won’t have so much of an impact and influence on you.”

Tariro Mantsebo is a medical doctor and feminist from Zimbabwe, currently working in a remote part of South Africa. In this episode of The Power of Your Story Podcast, you will hear about her journey to confidence. She speaks to Julia Wiklander, founder of Girls’ Globe about reaching her goals despite other people’s doubts, her recent struggles with stress and working in a male dominated field. Tariro’s heartfelt insights gives us so much inspiration to be true to ourselves and to know that we are enough, purely by existing.

Alaa Al-Eryani

Alaa Al-Eryani: Courageous Self Love

“I started to believe that everything I was ever taught and told was wrong, and that my value as a woman is not less than a man. We are all human beings, we are all equals.” says Alaa Al-Eryani in this episode of The Power of Your Story Podcast. Alaa is a Yemeni Gender Equality advocate, a Women Deliver Young Leader, and the founder of The Yemeni Feminist Movement online platform. She shares her story of overcoming discriminatory gender norms, leaving an abusive marriage and her path to self-love.

The content on Girls’ Globe is created by our members – activists, advocates and experts on gender equality, human rights and social justice from around the world. 

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